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Ohio Department of Agriculture | Plant Health

Grape Commodity Survey

In 2010 a limited grape commodity survey was conducted in vineyards in four Ohio counties along lake Erie and the Ohio River. Pheromone traps were set for European Grapevine Moth (Lobesia botrana), Summer Fruit Tortrix Moth (Adoxophyes orana), Silver Y Moth (Autographa gamma), and Egyptian Cottonworm (Spodoptera littoralis), and visual surveys performed for Passionvine Mealybug (Planococcus minor). None of the pests were detected.

European Grapevine Moth (Lobesia botrana) is a significant pest of berries and berry-like fruits in Europe, the Mediterranean, southern Russia, Japan, the Middle East, Near East, and northern and western Africa (Avidov and Harpaz 1969). This pest feeds primarily on the flowers and fruits of grape (Vitis vinifera). However, L. botrana demonstrates the curious behavior of feeding on many different plant families (approx. 27), but only a few species within each family are suitable (Gabel et al. 1992). Some of its hosts belong to Apiaceae, Asteraceae, Compositae, Convolvulaceae, Oleaceae, Polygonaceae, Ranunculaceae, Rhamnaceae, Roseaceae, Thymeleaceae, Umbelliferae and Vitaceae. In addition to grape, other reported host plants include: barberry (Berberis spp.), black and red currant (Ribes nigrum), blackberry (Rubus fruticosus), blackthorn (Prunus spinosa), carnation (Dianthus spp.), cherry (Prunus avium), dogwood (Swida spp.), grape (Vitis vinifera), gooseberry (Ribes uva-crispa), kiwi/Chinese gooseberry (Actinidia chinensis), nectarine (Prunus persica), persimmon (Diospyros kaki, D. virginiana), plum (Prunus domestica), pomegranate (Punica granatum), and olive (Olea europaea). The moth was first reported in the US from Napa county, California in 2009.


2010 Survey Results

Egyptian Cottonworm (Spodoptera littoralis) has wide host range of at least 40 families. Potentially economically important hosts in Ohio include: onion, beet, cabbage, cauliflower, bell pepper, watermelon, soybean, sunflower, tomato, cereal crops, radish, roses, maize, and grape. The potential distribution in Ohio may reach as far north as the central part of the state where winters are mild. The pest can be observed any time of the year that plants are actively growing.


2010 Survey Results

Silver-Y moth (Autographa gamma) is a polyphagous pest and is considered a high risk for establishment in temperate and mixed broadleaf forest habitats. Its known distribution includes all of Europe and extends east through Asia to India and China. Adults can be observed from April through November.


2010 Survey Results

Summer Fruit Tortrix Moth (Adoxophyes orana) is a native of Europe and Asia but is not known to occur in the United States. It feeds on Rosaceous hosts such as apple, cherry, pear, and others, as well as maple, alder, birch, hawthorn, forsythia, ash, honeysuckle, alfalfa, poplar, oak, rose, willow, elm, and lilac. Females lay yellow masses of eggs in early spring. The larvae emerge and leave behind the transparent shell of the eggs. The head of the larvae is light brown to yellow. It has a greenish body ornamented with warts and light hairs. When disturbed, the larvae spin a silken thread to escape. This thread is also a possible method for movement via wind. Mature larvae spin a 1/3 to 1/2 inch cocoon before molting into light brown pupae. Pupae darken as they mature. Adult moths are 1/3 to 1/2 inch long with brownish wings marked in a variable dark-brown pattern. Males are smaller than females and have brighter colors. Two to three generations may occur per year, depending on temperature.


2010 Survey Results

Passionvine Mealybug (Planococcus minor) is a significant pest of more than 250 host plants in the Afrotropical, Australasian, Nearctic, Neotropical, and Oriental regions. Banana, citrus, cocoa, coffee, corn, grape, mango, potato, and soybean are among the more notable agricultural crops that may be affected by this pest.


2010 Survey Results

If you suspect you have found one of these pests, contact the Ohio Department of Agriculture Plant Pest Control Section.


Photo Gallery

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ECW Adult

ECW Adult

ECW Larva

SFTM Adult

SFTM Adult